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  Domain Name: A_deamin
Adenosine-deaminase (editase) domain. Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) can deaminate adenosine to form inosine. In long double-stranded RNA, this process is non-specific; it occurs site-specifically in RNA transcripts. The former is important in defence against viruses, whereas the latter may affect splicing or untranslated regions. They are primarily nuclear proteins, but a longer isoform of ADAR1 is found predominantly in the cytoplasm. ADARs are derived from the Tad1-like tRNA deaminases that are present across eukaryotes. These in turn belong to the nucleotide/nucleic acid deaminase superfamily and are characterized by a distinct insert between the two conserved cysteines that are involved in binding zinc.
No pairwise interactions found for the domain A_deamin

Total Mutations Found: 45
Total Disease Mutations Found: 32
This domain occurred 5 times on human genes (10 proteins).



  AICARDI-GOUTIERES SYNDROME 6
  AICARDI-GOUTIERES SYNDROME 6, INCLUDED
  DYSCHROMATOSIS SYMMETRICA HEREDITARIA


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Range on the Protein:  

   Protein ID            Protein Position

Domain Position:  


No Conserved Features/Sites Found for A_deamin



























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Please Cite: Peterson, T.A., Adadey, A., Santana-Cruz ,I., Sun, Y., Winder A, Kann, M.G., (2010) DMDM: Domain Mapping of Disease Mutations. Bioinformatics 26 (19), 2458-2459.

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