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  Domain Name: BTB
BTB/POZ domain. The BTB (for BR-C, ttk and bab) or POZ (for Pox virus and Zinc finger) domain is present near the N-terminus of a fraction of zinc finger (pfam00096) proteins and in proteins that contain the pfam01344 motif such as Kelch and a family of pox virus proteins. The BTB/POZ domain mediates homomeric dimerisation and in some instances heteromeric dimerisation. The structure of the dimerised PLZF BTB/POZ domain has been solved and consists of a tightly intertwined homodimer. The central scaffolding of the protein is made up of a cluster of alpha-helices flanked by short beta-sheets at both the top and bottom of the molecule. POZ domains from several zinc finger proteins have been shown to mediate transcriptional repression and to interact with components of histone deacetylase co-repressor complexes including N-CoR and SMRT. The POZ or BTB domain is also known as BR-C/Ttk or ZiN.
No pairwise interactions found for the domain BTB

Total Mutations Found: 8
Total Disease Mutations Found: 0
This domain occurred 102 times on human genes (150 proteins).




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Range on the Protein:  

   Protein ID            Protein Position

Domain Position:  


No Conserved Features/Sites Found for BTB








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Please Cite: Peterson, T.A., Adadey, A., Santana-Cruz ,I., Sun, Y., Winder A, Kann, M.G., (2010) DMDM: Domain Mapping of Disease Mutations. Bioinformatics 26 (19), 2458-2459.

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