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  Domain Name: FGF
Acidic and basic fibroblast growth factor family; FGFs are mitogens, which stimulate growth or differentiation of cells of mesodermal or neuroectodermal origin. The family plays essential roles in patterning and differentiation during vertebrate embryogenesis, and has neurotrophic activities. FGFs have a high affinity for heparan sulfate proteoglycans and require heparan sulfate to activate one of four cell surface FGF receptors. Upon binding to FGF, the receptors dimerize and their intracellular tyrosine kinase domains become active. FGFs have internal pseudo-threefold symmetry (beta-trefoil topology).
No pairwise interactions are available for this conserved domain.

Total Mutations Found: 13
Total Disease Mutations Found: 13
This domain occurred 20 times on human genes (47 proteins).



  DEAFNESS, CONGENITAL, WITH INNER EAR AGENESIS, MICROTIA, AND MICRODONTIA
  HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM 6 WITH OR WITHOUT ANOSMIA
  HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM 6 WITHOUT ANOSMIA
  SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA 27


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Range on the Protein:  

   Protein ID            Protein Position

Domain Position:  


Feature Name:Total Found:
heparin binding site (gly
receptor interaction site












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Please Cite: Peterson, T.A., Adadey, A., Santana-Cruz ,I., Sun, Y., Winder A, Kann, M.G., (2010) DMDM: Domain Mapping of Disease Mutations. Bioinformatics 26 (19), 2458-2459.

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