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  Domain Name: PolY
Y-family of DNA polymerases. Y-family DNA polymerases are a specialized subset of polymerases that facilitate translesion synthesis (TLS), a process that allows the bypass of a variety of DNA lesions. Unlike replicative polymerases, TLS polymerases lack proofreading activity and have low fidelity and low processivity. They use damaged DNA as templates and insert nucleotides opposite the lesions. The active sites of TLS polymerases are large and flexible to allow the accomodation of distorted bases. Most TLS polymerases are members of the Y-family, including Pol eta, Pol kappa/IV, Pol iota, Rev1, and Pol V, which is found exclusively in bacteria. In eukaryotes, the B-family polymerase Pol zeta also functions as a TLS polymerase. Expression of Y-family polymerases is often induced by DNA damage and is believed to be highly regulated. TLS is likely induced by the monoubiquitination of the replication clamp PCNA, which provides a scaffold for TLS polymerases to bind in order to access the lesion. Because of their high error rates, TLS polymerases are potential targets for cancer treatment and prevention.
No pairwise interactions are available for this conserved domain.

Total Mutations Found: 5
Total Disease Mutations Found: 3
This domain occurred 4 times on human genes (7 proteins).



  XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM, VARIANT TYPE


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Range on the Protein:  

   Protein ID            Protein Position

Domain Position:  


Feature Name:Total Found:
active site
DNA binding site






















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Please Cite: Peterson, T.A., Adadey, A., Santana-Cruz ,I., Sun, Y., Winder A, Kann, M.G., (2010) DMDM: Domain Mapping of Disease Mutations. Bioinformatics 26 (19), 2458-2459.

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