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  Domain Name: SCAN
SCAN oligomerization domain. The SCAN domain (named after SRE-ZBP, CTfin51, AW-1 and Number 18 cDNA) is found in several vertebrate proteins that contain C2H2 zinc finger motifs, many of which may be transcription factors playing roles in cell survival and differentiation. This protein-interaction domain is able to mediate homo- and hetero-oligomerization of SCAN-containing proteins. Some SCAN-containing proteins, including those of lower vertebrates, do not contain zinc finger motifs. It has been noted that the SCAN domain resembles a domain-swapped version of the C-terminal domain of the HIV capsid protein. This domain model features elements common to the three general groups of SCAN domains (SCAN-A1, SCAN-A2, and SCAN-B). The SCAND1 protein is truncated at the C-terminus with respect to this model, the SCAND2 protein appears to have a truncated central helix.
No pairwise interactions are available for this conserved domain.

Total Mutations Found: 10
Total Disease Mutations Found: 0
This domain occurred 44 times on human genes (59 proteins).




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Range on the Protein:  

   Protein ID            Protein Position

Domain Position:  


Feature Name:Total Found:
dimerization interface










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Please Cite: Peterson, T.A., Adadey, A., Santana-Cruz ,I., Sun, Y., Winder A, Kann, M.G., (2010) DMDM: Domain Mapping of Disease Mutations. Bioinformatics 26 (19), 2458-2459.

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