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  Domain Name: Syntaxin
Syntaxin. Syntaxins are the prototype family of SNARE proteins. They usually consist of three main regions - a C-terminal transmembrane region, a central SNARE domain which is characteristic of and conserved in all syntaxins (pfam05739), and an N-terminal domain that is featured in this entry. This domain varies between syntaxin isoforms; in syntaxin 1A it is found as three alpha-helices with a left-handed twist. It may fold back on the SNARE domain to allow the molecule to adopt a 'closed' configuration that prevents formation of the core fusion complex - it thus has an auto-inhibitory role. The function of syntaxins is determined by their localisation. They are involved in neuronal exocytosis, ER-Golgi transport and Golgi-endosome transport, for example. They also interact with other proteins as well as those involved in SNARE complexes. These include vesicle coat proteins, Rab GTPases, and tethering factors.

Total Mutations Found: 5
Total Disease Mutations Found: 0
This domain occurred 11 times on human genes (13 proteins).




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Range on the Protein:  

   Protein ID            Protein Position

Domain Position:  


No Conserved Features/Sites Found for Syntaxin










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Please Cite: Peterson, T.A., Adadey, A., Santana-Cruz ,I., Sun, Y., Winder A, Kann, M.G., (2010) DMDM: Domain Mapping of Disease Mutations. Bioinformatics 26 (19), 2458-2459.

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